Man Gets Frustrated With Other Men After Witnessing How A Latina Got Catcalled Multiple Times In Just 5 Minutes

“Just be quiet and let her go where she’s going.” That’s the advice that Rafi D’Angelo from Harlem gave men on his Tumblr blog ‘So Let’s Talk About’ after explaining how he heard a woman getting catcalled 3 times in just 5 minutes while walking in the same direction as her. Scroll down to read D’Angelo’s story in his own words.

The scene that D’Angelo described can be an unpleasant common occurrence for women (and men!). According to Business Insider, 65 percent of women and 25 percent of men in the United States reported having been on the receiving end of at least one type of street harassment in their lives. What’s more, most have reported being catcalled or harassed on the street more than once. And for some, this is an everyday occurrence.

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Catcalling is something that many women (and men) have to deal with often

Image credits:FlairImages (not the actual photo)

Rafi D’Angelo shared a story about how he saw a woman get catcalled 3 times in just 5 minutes

Image credits: rafi-dangelo

Image credits: rafi-dangelo

Image credits: rafi-dangelo

Image credits: rafi-dangelo

Image credits: rafi-dangelo

Image credits: rafi-dangelo

Street harassment can have negative effects on our emotions and our minds. Targets of catcalling can feel threatened, scared, annoyed, angry, and embarrassed. All of these feelings can affect how the person’s day will go: they might be less productive at work because their mind keeps jumping back to the interaction or they might snap at their friends because they’re on edge.

While there’s probably no ‘perfect’ universal strategy on how to deal with catcallers, there are plenty of tips that women and men give on how to handle the situation (which just goes to show how widespread the problem really is).

Anita Roberts, the founder of Safeteen, told CBC that women can give street harassers “the look” that communicates to them that they don’t like what they’re doing. They can also put up a hand in front of them to show them that they should stop.

If you decide to speak to your catcaller as you’re walking by, use a neutral tone, be clear and firm. Don’t provoke them but also make it crystal clear that what they’re doing is not acceptable.

Bystanders also have an obligation to step in. If you see that somebody is being harassed, you can tell the catcaller to knock it off. Or you could even ask the victim if they require any assistance. It’s up to every member of their community to make it better and safer for everyone.

And this is how people reacted to D’Angelo’s post

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