Look How Small We Are In The Universe

We are so established in the bubbles of our social lives that often we forget how unimportant a few of the important things are when put versus the entire image. And while for some individuals this awareness might be soothing, that a spilled coffee, a lost task or a loss of a relationship is simply such a little portion of things occurring in deep space, for others the idea can be definitely frightening.

Why not take a better take a look at what’s out there and compare how huge the surrounding universe is compared to our little green world? See on your own simply how huge Jupiter is compared to The United States and Canada? Or how huge our sun is compared to the biggest observed star? Possibly you’ll need to pick up a 2nd and re-evaluate how you view whatever around you!

This is the Earth, a planet that we all currently live on

Image credits: NASA

And this is the solar system where our planet shares space with the other 7

Image credits: NASA

The planetary system is interesting, with a history of very little, not little bit, simply 4.568 billion years! It includes a single star (Sun, duh!), 8 worlds (Mercury, Venus, Earth, Mars,
Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, Neptune) and 3 widely accepted dwarf worlds (Ceres, Pluto, Eris). Oh, and whatever in between, such as moons and asteroids and such. The system mass of the planetary system is 1.0014 solar masses (one solar mass is equal to roughly 2 × 1030 kg, do the computations) and most of the system’s mass remains in the Sun (99,86 %) with the staying bulk included in Jupiter.

This is how far away (to scale) the Moon is from the Earth which doesn’t seem as much

Image credits: Nickshanks

However, you can fit every planet in the solar system in that gap. Quite cool, huh?

Image credits: reddit

Jupiter is our giant of the solar system. It is so big that the entire continent of North America looks like a green speck on it

Image credits: John Brady/Astronomy Central

Jupiter is the biggest world in our planetary system. Called after the Roman god of sky and lightning, Jupiter is a world with a radius of 69,911 km (43,441 mi) and an area of 6.1419 × 1010 km2 (2.3714 × 1010 sq mi) which would be around 122 Earths. Now that’s impressive! Unlike worlds like Earth and Mars (that have rocky, terrestrial surfaces), Jupiter is a gas giant, indicating that it consists primarily of hydrogen and helium for which it is often called a stopped working star (since they consist of the exact same standard components of a star). When compared to the sun, the world looks like a meek little bubble as its mass is just one-thousandth that of the Sun, nevertheless, if you integrated the masses of the staying planetary system worlds, Jupiter would still be two-and-a-half times larger.

Another big body is Saturn. Here you can see how big it is compared to Earth (or 6 of them)

Image credits: John Brady/Astronomy Central

If Saturn’s rings were placed around Earth, here’s how they would look

Image credits: Ron Miller

Our observation of other objects in the universe have improved quite a bit, and these images of Pluto are a good example

Image credits: NASA

Ah, the heartbreak of a century, initially called a world and after that being removed of the title and reclassified as a dwarf. Despite the fact that it took place back in 2006, there are still individuals who are disturbed over the International Astronomical Union’s choice to specify the term ‘world’ which resulted in Pluto being left out. In timeless folklore, Pluto is the god of the afterlife and the ruler of the underworld. Regardless of it not being a world any longer, individuals still looked to reach it and in 2015 The New Horizons spacecraft ended up being the very first probe to carry out a flyby of Pluto. It took nearly a year for the spacecraft to return the gathered info, however, it was so worth it.

Here’s how an artist imagined Rosetta’s Comet (67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko) would look when compared to the size of downtown Los Angeles. Makes you think about those end-of-the-world movies, no?

Image credits: anosmicovni

Although none of the previous objects have substance compared to our sun, a yellow dwarf star

Image credits: ajamesmccarthy

Sitting at the center of our system, the Sun is an almost ideal sphere of hot plasma with an area of 6.09 × 1012 km2 which is 12,000 Earths (simply think of it for a moment!). It takes 8 minutes and 19 s for the light from the Sun to reach our world. The Sun is made from ~ 73% hydrogen with the rest being primarily helium (~ 25%) and just small quantities of much heavier aspects, consisting of oxygen, carbon, neon, and iron. According to Wikipedia, the Sun “presently merges about 600 million lots of hydrogen into helium every second, transforming 4 million lots of matter into energy every second as a result”. The energy (which can take 10,000– 170,000 years to leave from its core) is the source of Sun’s light and heat. When these procedures reduce, the Sun’s core will increase density and temperature level and the external layers will broaden, taking in the orbits of Mercury and Venus and rendering Earth uninhabitable. However that’s not going to occur in the upcoming 5 billion years or two, absolutely nothing to fret about!

This is how Earth looks from the surface of the Moon, not too bad?

Image credits: NASA/Bill Anders

Well, Mars gives a completely different perspective to our little planet

Image credits: NASA

And then there’s the view from behind Saturn’s rings, we seem like a planet for ants

Image credits: NASA

Around 2.9 billion miles away, just beyond Neptune, we seem smaller than a grain of salt

Image credits: NASA

So if that doesn’t put things into perspective, then let’s go big. This is how Earth looks when compared to the Sun

Image credits: John Brady/Astronomy Central

Though the Sun doesn’t look as bad when looking from the surface of Mars, right?

Image credits: NASA

There are so many stars in the universe that their number outweighs how many grains of sand there are on Earth’s beaches

Image credits: Sean O’Flaherty

Which means that our sun is just a grain of sand in the whole picture, especially compared to such giants like VY Canis Majoris

Image credits: Oona Räisänen

If VY Canis Majoris was placed in the center of our solar system, it would almost reach the orbit of Saturn

Image credits: Discovery Channel

If the Sun was scaled down to the size of a white blood cell, the Milky Way would be the size of the continental United States

Image credits: NASA

So when you look at our galaxy from that perspective, our tiny Earth truly loses its sense of magnitude

Almost all individual stars we see at night scattered all across the sky are just a fraction of what lies out there

Image credits: ScienceDump

And if you thought that the Milky Way is huge, here it is next to IC 1101, which is 1.04 billion light-years away

Image credits: IC 1101

To top the overwhelming vastness of universe exemplified so far, here’s a photo of thousands of galaxies taken by the Hubble Space Telescope

Image credits: NASA

And here’s one of them, UDF 423, 7.7 billion light-years away

Image credits: NASA

What you see at night is just a small part of the universe

Image credits: NASA

And if you came here expecting black holes, here it is! This one’s compared to Earth’s orbit. Terrifying, isn’t it?

Image credits: D. Benningfield/K. Gebhardt/StarDate

 

What’s your Reaction?
+1
0
+1
3
+1
0
+1
8
+1
0
+1
0
+1
0